Explanation of motor requirements for BungeeProp for a person new to RC

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  • #1417096
    Avatarstevegraham
    Participant

    Hi,
    Can someone explain the motor requirements for a Bungee Prop. It says “any 10-30grams, 28-05, 2800KV” and I’ve looked at the options and none are available from any supplier (most noteably Hobby King) at least via the Australian and Global wharehouses. I understand the grams is weight so that’s fine. Basically I don’t understand what the “28”, “05” (is that somehow related to needing a 2S LiPo??) and “2800KV” actually mean. I also know I need to find a motor that works with a 2S LiPo and <= 12A ESC.

    I’m quite excited about the Bungee Prop because I successfully printed the Spitfire that came with my Prusa 3D and built it and flew it at extremely high speed straight into a tree upon which it exploded into a huge number of pieces. Flight time 10 secs. After laughing a LOT I realised I had no idea what I’m doing. I’ve now spent ages on a simulator and want to print this very slow plane so I can learn but I’m struggling to find a motor.

    #1417101
    Avatarbktim1988
    Participant

    Brushless motors use a standard numbering scheme to describe their physical size and kV rating. For example: let’s assume we have a 5055-3000kV Brushless Outrunner Motor. We break the numbers out as follows: [50] [55] – [3000]
    [50] The first two numbers represent the diameter of the motor’s housing in millimeters; in this example 50mm
    [55] The second two numbers represent the length of the motor housing in millimeters; in this example 55mm
    [3000] The numbers after the dash represent the kV rating of the motor; in this example 3000kV. The kV rating (not to be confused with kilo-volt) is the RPM of the motor (k) per volt (V) with no load. For example, a brushless motor with a kV rating of 3000 powered by a 12V power source would be capable of 36,000 RPMs (multiply 3000×12). This is the max RPMs that this motor can reach under no load. A motor with a higher kV will have more top end speed, but not as much acceleration/torque. A motor with a lower kV will not be as fast, but will accelerate faster and have more torque.

    – the above was information pulled from motionrc’s main web page. hopefully it helps.

    #1417102
    Avatarbktim1988
    Participant

    Brushless motors use a standard numbering scheme to describe their physical size and kV rating. For example: let’s assume we have a 5055-3000kV Brushless Outrunner Motor. We break the numbers out as follows: [50] [55] – [3000]
    [50] The first two numbers represent the diameter of the motor’s housing in millimeters; in this example 50mm
    [55] The second two numbers represent the length of the motor housing in millimeters; in this example 55mm
    [3000] The numbers after the dash represent the kV rating of the motor; in this example 3000kV. The kV rating (not to be confused with kilo-volt) is the RPM of the motor (k) per volt (V) with no load. For example, a brushless motor with a kV rating of 3000 powered by a 12V power source would be capable of 36,000 RPMs (multiply 3000×12). This is the max RPMs that this motor can reach under no load. A motor with a higher kV will have more top end speed, but not as much acceleration/torque. A motor with a lower kV will not be as fast, but will accelerate faster and have more torque.

    – the above was information pulled from motionrc’s main web page. hopefully it helps.

    #1417108
    Avatarstevegraham
    Participant

    Thanks so much. I really appreciate it!!!

    That makes perfect sense. I must say that I was VERY confused about the kilo-volt rating, which I now know is NOT kilo-volts. I’ve found a motor that I think will be okay.

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